100 Great Moments in Big Ten Men's Basketball History






During the 2004-05 year, the Big Ten Conference will commemorate the 100th season of men's basketball. The League will celebrate this milestone with a website tribute highlighting the past 100 years of men's basketball history and tradition. Over a 100-day span, the Conference office will post a daily centennial moment in men's basketball history, ending on the final day of the Big Ten Men's Basketball Tournament on March 13, 2005

  • From 1999-2000, Michigan State became the first school to win back-to-back Big Ten Tournament titles. The Spartans defeated Illinois in both championship games, claiming a 67-50 victory in the 1999 title contest, while posting a 76-61 victory in 2000. Mateen Cleaves earned MVP honors in 1999 after posting back-to-back double-figure assists games, including a Big Ten Tournament record of 11 assists against Wisconsin in the semifinal round. Teammate Morris Peterson followed Cleaves, claiming the 2000 Tournament MVP award after averaging 18 points per game. (Posted March 13)
  • On March 16, 2003, Illinois captured its first Big Ten Tournament title in its third appearance in the championship game, by defeating Ohio State, 72-59, at the United Center. Brian Cook earned MVP honors and finished his career with a Tournament total of 157 points in 10 games to rank second all-time behind former teammate Cory Bradford. Roger Powell joined Cook on the All-Tournament team. (Posted March 12)
  • In 2001, the Conference set an all-time attendance record of 109,769, an average of 21,954 per session at the 2001 Big Ten Tournament at the United Center. The total exceeded the 2000 mark of by 9,475 and bettered the previous record by 4,937. (Posted March 11)
  • On March 14, 2004, after being knocked out in the opening game in each of the last three Big Ten Tournaments, Wisconsin claimed its first-ever Conference title by defeating No. 1 Illinois, 70-53, in Conseco Fieldhouse. The Badgers were led by Tournament MVP Devin Harris, who tallied a game-high 29 points against the Illini. Teammate Mike Wilkinson, who finished with 11 points and five rebounds, joined Harris on the All-Tournament team. (Posted March 10)
  • On March 4, 1999, Purdue's Brian Cardinal set a Tournament record after scoring 33 points against Michigan in the first round of the 1999 Big Ten Tournament. As part of his 33-point effort, Cardinal tallied a career-best five three-pointers, just one trey shy of another Big Ten mark, while also posting a Conference Tournament record of 12 free throws against the Wolverines. (Posted March 9)
  • On March 10, 2002, Ohio State became the fourth different school to win the Big Ten Tournament after downing Iowa, 81-64, in the championship finals. OSU entered the tourney tied for the fewest wins in Tournament action, however, the Buckeyes defeated Michigan and Illinois before advancing to their first-ever Conference Tournament final against Iowa. (Posted March 8)
  • On March 7, 2002, Minnesota's Dusty Rychart went 11-of-12 from the field to set a Big Ten Tournament single-game record in field goal percentage (.917) in the first round of the 2002 Big Ten Tournament. Rychart completed the game with 23 points to lead the Golden Gophers to an 84-60 victory over Penn State. He finished his career ranked sixth on the school's all-time field goal (.519) and free throw percentage (.775) lists. (March 7)
  • On March 9, 2001, Joe Crispin's thrilling off-balance trey with little time left capped a stunning 22-point performance and gave Penn State its biggest upset in school history and a 65-63 win over No. 2 Michigan State in the 2001 Big Ten Tournament quarterfinals. Crispin notched a game-high four three-pointers, while also going 6-of-6 from the free throw line, while teammate Titus Ivory added 17 points and three steals against the defending Tournament champion Spartans. (Posted March 6)
  • In 2001, Iowa became the first team in the history of the Big Ten Tournament to win four games in four days after posting a 63-61 victory over Indiana in the championship game. The Hawkeyes' Reggie Evans, who poured in 30 points and notched 18 rebounds against the Hoosiers, earned MVP honors. He also established a Big Ten Tournament record with 51 points during the 2001 event. (Posted March 5)
  • On Dec. 9, 1996, the Council of Presidents/Chancellors announced the establishment of an 11-team Big Ten men's basketball postseason tournament, beginning with the 1997-98 season. The dream became a reality when Minnesota and Northwestern tipped off the first game of the 1998 Big Ten Men's Basketball Tournament at the United Center in Chicago. During the four-day event, a total of 108,555 fans attended the Tournament, marking the second highest of any NCAA Division I conference basketball tournament. (Posted March 4)
  • On January 31, 1976, Indiana defeated Wisconsin, 114-61, to claim its 28th consecutive Big Ten victory and break the previous Big Ten record of 27 wins set by Ohio State from 1960-62. The Hoosiers would extend the streak to 37 straight victories before falling to Purdue, 80-63, on January 6, 1977. (Posted March 3)
  • In 1942, Illinois won its fifth Big Ten title with a team of four sophomores and a junior, better known to the nation as the "Whiz Kids." Beating teams by an average margin of 24 points, the Fighting Illini would win the Conference championship again in 1943, losing only one non-conference game to boast a record of 17-1. However, the "Kids" were unable to finish out their college careers as all were called to service in the armed forces immediately prior to the 1943 NCAA Tournament. (Posted March 2)
  • On March 15, 1969, Rick Mount notched a jumper with four seconds left to give Purdue a 75-73 overtime victory over Marquette and advance the Boilermakers to their first-ever Final Four. Purdue's success would carry over five days later in the semifinal round as Mount tallied 36 points, his second 30-plus point performance of the tournament, to lead the Boilermakers to a 92-65 rout over North Carolina. The magical run would end against the reigning national champion UCLA, which was coached by former Boilermaker and All-American John Wooden, as the Bruins defeated the Boilermakers, 92-72, in the championship game. (Posted March 1)
  • On February 1, 1969, Michigan's Rudy Tomjanovich became the last Big Ten player to tally 30 rebounds in a 112-100 loss to Loyola-Chicago. A two-time First Team All-Big Ten honoree, Tomjanovich finished his career as Michigan's all-time leading rebounder with 1,039 caroms, while also ranking seventh on the League's career list. (Posted Feb. 28)
  • In 1980, Iowa and Purdue advanced to the Final Four, marking the second time in Conference history that two Big Ten teams competed in the NCAA semifinals. Iowa would come back from several mid-season injuries to post wins over N.C. State, Syracuse and Georgetown before falling to eventual national champion Louisville in the Final Four. Purdue knocked off La Salle, St. John's, Indiana and Duke on its way to the Boilermakers' first Final Four since 1969. Purdue suffered a 67-62 loss to UCLA in semifinals, but went on to defeat Iowa, 75-58, in the consolation finals. (Posted Feb. 27)
  • In 1979, Michigan State's Greg Kelser became the first Big Ten player to reach 2,000 career points and 1,000 career rebounds. He finished his senior season with an all-time mark of 2,014 points and 1,092 rebounds, while helping the Spartans to a national championship and a Big Ten title. Since Kelser's remarkable feat, only two other Big Ten players - Purdue's Joe Barry Carroll and Ohio State's Herb Williams - have since reached the 2,000-point and 1,000-rebound barrier during their collegiate career. (Posted Feb. 26)
  • In March 2002, Indiana enjoyed a memorable run as the Hoosiers advanced to their eighth Final Four in school history. Under second-year head coach Mike Davis, Indiana defeated Utah, UNC-Wilmington, Duke, and Kent State, before facing Oklahoma in the semifinal round. Jeff Newton led Indiana with 19 points off the bench against the Sooners, while Dane Fife and the IU defense shut down Oklahoma, which shot only 36.4 percent from the field. The Hoosiers' magical run would finally come to end in the championship game as Maryland defeated Indiana, 64-52. (Posted Feb. 25)
  • On February 24, 2001, Ohio State's Ken Johnson posted six rejections in a 69-57 victory at Northwestern to become the Big Ten's all-time leading shot blocker with 434. He surpassed the former record of 428 blocked shots set by Penn State's Calvin Booth from 1995-1999. Johnson would finish his career with a total of 444 career blocks to rank fourth all-time in NCAA history behind Adonal Foyle (Colgate-492), Tim Duncan (Wake Forest-481) and Alonzo Mourning (Georgetown-453). (Posted Feb. 24)
  • In 1999, Northwestern's Evan Eschmeyer became the first three-time All-Big Ten First Team honoree in school annals and the 10th in League history. He led the Wildcats in scoring for three consecutive seasons (1997-1999), while also ranking first in rebounds from 1996-1999. Eschmeyer finished his career, second all-time in scoring with 1,805 career points, while earning All-America honors. (Posted Feb. 23)
  • In 1912, two teams went undefeated for the first and only time in Big Ten history. Purdue and Wisconsin never met in regular season play as both posted perfect marks during the 1912 Conference slate. The Boilermakers, under third-year head coach Ralph Jones, finished with a 12-0 overall mark and a 10-0 League record, while the Badgers boasted a 15-0 overall record and a 12-0 Conference mark. Both teams would share the Big Ten title, however Wisconsin went on to earn the most votes by the Helms Athletics Foundation to claim its first national championship at the conclusion of the season. (Posted Feb. 21)
  • On April 3, 2000, Michigan State defeated Florida, 89-76, in Indianapolis for its second national championship in school history. Heading into the NCAA Tournament, the Spartans captured their third consecutive Conference title, while also winning the 2000 Big Ten tourney crown. MSU steamrolled through the tournament, defeating Valparaiso, Utah, Syracuse and Iowa State before meeting fellow Big Ten member Wisconsin in the Final Four - the second time in Conference history that two League teams met in the semifinal round. The Spartans went on to claim the NCAA title, while also becoming the first team in NCAA history to defeat all six of its NCAA Tournament opponents by double figures since the event expanded to 64 teams.(Posted Feb. 21)
  • On January 25, 1964, Ohio State's Gary Bradds scored 47 points in a 98-87 victory over Purdue. It would become the first of six consecutive games in which Bradds topped 40 points, marking a Big Ten record. He finished the season, leading the League in scoring for the second consecutive season (33.9 ppg), while earning national Player of the Year honors by the Associated Press and United Press International. (Posted Feb. 20)
  • In 1995, Michigan State's Shawn Respert scored his 1,544 career point in Big Ten games to become the all-time Conference leader. In his senior year, he led the Spartans to a 22-6 overall record and a second-place finish in the Big Ten with a 14-4 League mark, while leading the League in scoring with 25.5 points per game. Respert was also MSU's career scoring leader with 2,531 points, and claimed Player of the Year honors by the National Association of Basketball Coaches, the first for a Spartan since Scott Skiles was named Basketball Times Player of the Year in 1986. (Posted Feb. 19)
  • From 1991-1994, Indiana's Todd Leary set a Big Ten record with 46 consecutive free throws. The new mark took almost four seasons to complete as Leary hit the first four at the end of 1990, red-shirted during the 1990-91 season, before tallying 42 straight free throws his sophomore, junior and senior year (1992-94). His streak would finally come to end against Minnesota on Jan. 26,1994, when he shot 7-of-8 from the line. (Posted Feb. 18)
  • On January 3, 1941, Purdue's Ward Lambert captured his 200th Big Ten victory with a 64-19 victory over Chicago in West Lafayette, Ind. He directed the Boilermakers to 11 Big Ten titles and a Helms Foundation national championship, while compiling a 371-152 mark in his 28 seasons at Purdue. Only former Indiana head coach Bobby Knight (353 wins) and Purdue's Gene Keady (255) have since reached the 200-victory plateau in Big Ten play. (Posted Feb. 17)
  • In 1999, Michigan State and Ohio State advanced to the NCAA Final Four, marking the fifth time in League history that two Big Ten teams competed in the semifinals. Michigan State dominated in the early rounds of the NCAA Tournament, however the Spartans' postseason run would eventually end with a 68-62 loss against a tough Duke team in the semifinal round. Ohio State's fate followed the same path as the Buckeyes fell to eventual national champion Connecticut, 64-58. (Posted Feb. 16)
  • In 1947, the Big Ten was well represented as four players were picked in the first round of the first-ever National Basketball Association draft. Ohio State led the list of the League's first rounders with Paul Huston signing with the Chicago Stags and Jack Underman being selected in the first round by the Saint Louis Bombers. Purdue's Ed Ehlers was drafted by the Boston Celtics, while Wisconsin's Glen Selbo, who led the Badgers to the 1947 Big Ten title, signed with the Toronto Huskies. (Posted Feb. 15)
  • On March 30, 1987, Indiana's Keith Smart fired a baseline jumper from 12 feet with four seconds left to clinch the Hoosiers' fifth national championship and third under head coach Bobby Knight in a 74-73 win over Syracuse. In the first season of college basketball's three-point shot, Steve Alford hit seven treys to finish with a game-high 23 points, while Smart followed with 21 points. Alford was named to the All-Tournament Team, while Smart earned MVP honors. (Posted Feb. 14)
  • On March 26, 1994, Glenn Robinson finished the season as the nation's scoring leader with 30.3 points per game, the first Big Ten player to earn this honor since Boilermaker Dave Schellhase in 1965-66. Earning a Conference record five Big Ten Player of the Week honors in a season, he would also become the first League player to post 1,000 points in a single year, ranking eighth among Purdue's all-time single-season scoring leaders with 1,030 points. (Posted Feb. 13)
  • On December 2, 1963, Ohio State's Fred Taylor became the fastest coach in the Big Ten to reach 100 wins as the Buckeyes posted a 74-68 victory over Butler at St. John Arena. Taylor eclipsed the 100-victory plateau in only his fifth season at Ohio State. During his 18-year tutelage, he would guide the Buckeyes to seven Big Ten titles, four Final Four appearances and a national championship. Taylor currently ranks eighth in all-time Big Ten victories with 158, while also remaining the sixth-fastest coach to reach 100 wins in NCAA history. (Posted Feb. 12)
  • On March 26, 1979, Michigan State captured the 1979 national title over Indiana State with a 75-64 rout in the championship game. The Spartans, led by Earvin "Magic" Johnson, were not expected to defeat the No. 1 team in the country, unbeaten Indiana State, which was also led by another soon-to-be great NBA player, Larry Bird. However, MSU jumped out to a big first half lead, paced by Johnson, who notched a game-high 24 points to claim Tournament MVP honors. The game still remains the highest rated college basketball game in television history. (Posted Feb. 11)
  • In 1988, Northwestern center Shon Morris became the first men's basketball player in NU history to claim two consecutive First Team Academic All-America honors. He currently ranks seventh on Northwestern's all-time scoring list with 1,407 points and is an Associate Athletic Director in charge of development on the Evanston campus, while also working for ESPN Plus television. (Posted Feb. 10)
  • On February 19, 1966, Michigan posted a Big Ten record 128 points to defeat Purdue at home. The Wolverines were led by three-time All-American Cazzie Russell, who notched 28 points on 12-of-19 shooting, while teammate James Myers added 14 rebounds to give Michigan a 128-94 victory over the Boilermakers. It marked the second straight game that the Wolverines scored more than 120 points as Michigan defeated Wisconsin, 120-102, just one week earlier. The Wolverines' would finish the year setting four Big Ten single-season records, while claiming their third Big Ten title and an NCAA Tournament appearance. Michigan's feat of 128 points still remains the Conference record. (Posted Feb. 9)
  • In 1987, Indiana's Steve Alford became the first men's basketball player to earn the Big Ten Jesse Owens Male Athlete of the Year award after leading the Hoosiers to a national championship and Big Ten title his senior season. The All-American finished his career as Indiana's all-time leading scorer with 2,438 before Calbert Cheaney broke his mark in 1993. (Posted Feb. 8)
  • From 1959-1963, Ohio State posted a Big Ten record of 50 consecutive wins at home. The Buckeyes opened the 1959 season with a 77-69 victory over Wake Forest on Dec. 1, 1959. OSU's next loss in St. John Arena would not occur until the beginning of 1963, when the Buckeyes fell to Davidson, 95-73, on Dec. 11, 1963. The record would stand for 32 years until Indiana tied it in 1995. Seven years later, Michigan State would break the record, posting 53 straight home triumphs from 1998-2002.  (Posted Feb. 7)
  • In 1934, Purdue won the Big Ten Championship without one man over six-feet tall. The Boilermakers, led by All-American Norman Cottom, posted a 17-3 overall record and a 10-2 Conference mark to claim Purdue's seventh Big Ten title in school history. Cottom finished the season as the League's leading scorer, averaging 9.0 points per game. (Posted Feb. 6)
  • On March 30, 1981, Indiana claimed its fourth NCAA title with a 63-50 victory over North Carolina. The Hoosiers put this one away in the second half, jumping out to an 11-point lead seven minutes into the period. Isiah Thomas became the third Indiana player in school history to pick up Tournament MVP honors after posting 19 of his game-high 23 points in the second half. He also set single-season school records in assists (197) and steals (74) that year. (Posted Feb. 5)
  • On January 5, 1976, Michigan State's Terry Furlow became the last Conference player to score 50 points in a game as he notched 50 in a 105-88 victory over Iowa. For the second consecutive year, the two-time First Team All-Big Ten honoree concluded the season as the League's leading scorer, tallying 31.0 points per game. (Posted Feb. 4)
  • In 1989, Illinois made its first trip to the Final Four since 1952 after holding off seventh-ranked Syracuse, 89-86, in the Midwest Regional. Syracuse blitzed the Illini early, running out to a 25-13 lead. However, Illinois bounced back, catching Syracuse early in the second half and taking a strong lead, 84-78, with just two minutes remaining. The Orangeman had one last chance but missed a last second shot, giving Illinois the victory and its fourth Final Four appearance in school history. Kenny Battle led the way for Illinois, tallying 28 points. (Posted Feb. 3)
  • On March 31, 1993, sophomore Chad Kolander rejected a Georgetown shot with 2.7 seconds left to preserve Minnesota's 62-61 win in the National Invitational Tournament title game. Tournament MVP honoree Voshon Lenard led the Golden Gophers' to their first-ever NIT crown after posting a team-leading 19.8 scoring average in the five tournament contests. The Golden Gophers concluded the 1992-93 slate with a 22-10 overall record, marking their sixth season with 20 or more victories. (Posted Feb. 2)
  • In 1946, Ohio State became the first school in the nation to notch three consecutive trips to the NCAA Final Four. The Buckeyes would fail to advance to the championship game in all three years after three heartbreaking losses in the semifinal rounds. However, OSU came back after a loss to North Carolina in the 1946 Final Four to claim third-place honors with a 63-45 victory over California. The Buckeyes were paced by center Jack Underman, who notched a team-high 19 points, and Bob Bowen, who finished with 16 points. (Posted Feb. 1)
  • On February 24, 1964, current Big Ten Associate Commissioner Rich Falk set Northwestern's single-game record with 49 points in a 98-76 victory over Iowa. He also established the school record for field goals and field goal attempts against the Hawkeyes, shooting 19-of-38 from the floor. Falk went on to coach at NU for eight seasons (1978-86). Now at the League office, he currently oversees the men's basketball officiating program, while managing the annual Big Ten men's basketball Tournament. (Posted Jan. 31)
  • In 2004, Michigan became the first League school to win two National Invitation Tournament titles after clinching the 2004 and 1984 crowns. During the 1983-84 season, the Wolverines went 4-0 in the postseason by claiming an 83-63 victory over Notre Dame in the NIT championship game. Exactly 20 years later, the Wolverines won their second NIT title, defeating Rutgers, 62-55, in the finals. Michigan claimed both MVP honors those years with Tim McCormick winning in 1984, and Daniel Horton closing out his sophomore season with MVP accolades. (Posted Jan. 30)
  • On March 3, 1953, Indiana earned the first No. 1 ranking in the Associated Press poll in League history after claiming a 90-88 overtime victory over Northwestern. The Hoosiers would remain No. 1 heading into the NCAA Tournament, where they would capture their second national title in school history with a 69-68 victory over Kansas. Indiana also won its first undisputed Big Ten title with a 17-1 League mark. (Posted Jan. 29)
  • On March 10, 1962, Terry Dischinger led Purdue to a 77-75 victory over Michigan and became only the third player in Conference history to lead the Big Ten in scoring for three consecutive seasons. A two-time consensus All-American, he averaged 27.4 points in his sophomore season, followed by a 28.3 average in 1961. In his final season as a Boilermaker, Dischinger posted a Big Ten record of 32.8 points per game during the 1962 Big Ten season, becoming only the second player at that time to reach the 30-plus point average in League history. (Posted Jan. 28)
  • On March 4, 1978, Iowa's Clay Hargrave grabbed 12 rebounds in the Hawkeyes' season finale against Indiana to claim the Big Ten rebounding title for all games over Minnesota's Mychal Thompson. Hargrave averaged 9.9 boards per game and at 6-4, became the shortest player to lead the League in rebounding. (Posted Jan. 27)
  • In 1916, George Levis became Wisconsin's second All-American in school history after leading the Badgers to a 20-1 overall record and a Big Ten title. He was also the Conference-leading scorer with 109 points in 12 games. Levis moved on to coaching where he spent two seasons at the Indiana helm, tallying an overall record of 25-16, before working at his family's business - the Illinois Glass Company. Levis would later play a prominent role in developing basketball's glass backboards. (Posted Jan. 26)
  • In 1949, Illinois defeated Yale, 71-67, to advance to its first-ever NCAA Final Four. The Illini fell to Kentucky, 76-47, in the national semifinals but went on to defeat Oregon State, 57-53, for third place. The 1949 squad, led by Dike Eddleman, Bill Erickson and Walter Osterkorn, was Illinois' first 20-game winner since 1908 after posting a 21-4 mark, while also claiming its eighth Big Ten title in school history. (Posted Jan. 25)
  • In 1989, Michigan's Glen Rice set an NCAA Tournament record with 184 points in six games while leading the Wolverines to the national title. He would pace the Wolverines to their first-ever NCAA title with an 80-79 overtime victory over Seton Hall in the championship game. Rice finished his career as one of the most prolific scorers in the Conference, leading the Wolverines, while ranking third all-time in Big Ten history, with 2,442 career points. (Posted Jan. 24)
  • On January 9. 1932, Illinois clinched a 28-21 victory over visiting Purdue, snapping the Boilermakers' 15-game winning streak. Many blamed the loss to an unfortunate injury that occurred to Purdue's leading scorer and All-American John Wooden prior to the game. The senior co-captain's hand was cut when his coaches' car that he was riding in, hit a patch of ice and overturned as they headed to the arena. However, the Boilermakers came back to post a string of 11 victories, finishing the season with a 17-1 overall record and claiming the Helms Foundation national championship (prior to NCAA postseason play). (Posted Jan. 23)
  • On March 16, 1968, Ohio State's Dave Sorenson tossed in a fallaway jump shot in the final five seconds to give the Buckeyes an 82-81 victory over Kentucky and their eighth trip to the NCAA Final Four. OSU fell to North Carolina, 80-66, in the semifinals, however, the Buckeyes bounced back to post an upset over Houston, 89-85, in the third-place game. Junior John Howell led the Buckeyes with 26 points, while Bill Hosket and Sorenson added 19 each. (Posted Jan. 22)
  • On March 25, 2001, Michigan State defeated Temple, 69-62, to advance to its third consecutive Final Four, becoming only the ninth school in NCAA history to earn this feat and the third since the field was expanded to 64 teams. In the national semifinals, the Spartans fell to Arizona, 80-61, however MSU finished the season with a 28-5 overall record and 13-3 Big Ten mark, claiming its fourth consecutive Big Ten title. (Posted Jan. 21)
  • In 1964, Indiana's Dick Van Arsdale became the Big Ten's first Academic All-American during the 1963-64 season. He led the Hoosiers in scoring (535) and rebounding (298) that year, while also claiming First Team All-Big Ten accolades. Van Arsdale would earn another Academic All-America award in 1965, joining his brother, Tom, on the team. (Posted Jan. 20)
  • On December 9, 1937, Iowa's Nile Kinnick competed in his first game as a Hawkeye, posting five points in a 44-20 win over Carleton. That season, Kinnick averaged 6.1 points per game as the starting forward, while helping Iowa to an 11-9 overall record and a 6-6 Big Ten mark. As one of Iowa's multi-sport athletes, Kinnick would later become the second Big Ten player to win the Heisman Trophy in 1939, after leading the Hawkeye football team to a 6-1-1 mark and a second-place finish in the League. (Posted Jan. 19)
  • On December 16, 2000, Illinois' Cory Bradford set an NCAA record by hitting a three pointer in his 74th consecutive game, while leading the Illini to an 81-73 victory over No. 7 Arizona. Bradford's streak began in the first game of his freshman season against Wake Forest on Nov. 11, 1998, before eventually ending at 88 straight contests against Wisconsin on February 13, 2001. (Posted Jan. 18)
  • On November 25, 2000, the brother duo of Joe and John Crispin led Penn State to a 73-68 victory over nationally-ranked Kentucky at Rupp Arena. The Nittany Lion win marked only the second time in Rupp history that the Wildcats had lost a home opener and also broke Kentucky's 20-game home winning streak. Joe Crispin hit 11-of-26 shots, including seven three-pointers to finish with a game-high 31 points, while his brother, Jon, posted a career-high 26 points. The Crispin brothers combined for 57 of PSU's 73 points. (Posted Jan. 17)
  • On December 13, 1951, Minnesota became the first Big Ten squad to defeat a No. 1 ranked opponent after posting a 61-57 victory over top-ranked Kentucky, in Minneapolis, Minn. Eddie Kalafat led the Gophers, posting a game-high 30 points to give Minnesota its second win of the season. The Golden Gophers went on to claim two more victories over Top 25 teams that season including a 55-49 victory over No. 19 Michigan State and a 74-61 rout over No. 18 Indiana to finish the year with a 15-7 overall record. (Posted Jan. 16)
  • In 1974, Purdue won the first National Invitation Tournament title in League history with an 87-81 victory over Utah in New York's Madison Square Garden. The Boilermakers defeated No. 7 North Carolina, Hawaii and Jacksonville to advance to their first-ever NIT championship game. Against the Utes, Frank Kendrick and John Garrett combined for 49 points to lead Purdue. For his outstanding performance, Kendrick was named to the All-Tournament team, while also claiming the Boilermakers' MVP honor for the second consecutive season. (Posted Jan. 15)
  • In 1939, Ohio State senior captain Jimmy Hull led the Buckeyes to their first-ever NCAA Final Four. OSU posted back-to-back wins over Wake Forest and Villanova to advance to the finals held at Northwestern's Patten Gym. Unfortunately, with Hull unable to practice the week before the title game due to a sprained ankle, the Buckeyes were never the same and fell to Oregon, 46-33, in the championship contest. Hull finished his career setting a school scoring record with 134 points in 12 League contests that season, while also earning All-America honors.
  • In 1990, the Big Ten became the first League in the nation to have seven teams awarded NCAA bids in one year since the tournament field was expanded to 64 teams in 1985. That season, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Michigan State, Minnesota, Ohio State and Purdue all earned trips to the NCAA Tournament. The Conference would follow with three more seven-team appearances in 1994, 1999 and 2001. (Posted Jan. 13)
  • In 1985, Michigan's Roy Tarpley earned the first-ever Big Ten Player of the Year award. Tarpley led the Conference in rebounding with 9.9 boards per game, while also assisting the Wolverines to a Big Ten Championship and their first of six straight NCAA bids. Michigan finished the 1976-77 season, racking up a 26-4 overall record and a 16-2 Conference mark. Tarpley earned All-America honors, while also being named the Big Ten Chicago Tribune Most Valuable Player. (Posted Jan. 12)
  • In 1946, Iowa's Murray Wier became the first Big Ten player to lead the nation in scoring with 21 points per game. He led the Hawkeyes to a second-place finish in the Big Ten with an 8-4 Conference mark and 15-4 overall record. Wier earned Consensus All-America honors while also claiming Big Ten MVP accolades, a first by an Iowa player. (Posted Jan. 11)
  • In 2000, Wisconsin posted clutch performances over Fresno State, top-seeded Arizona, LSU and Purdue to advance to its second Final Four in school history. In the semifinal round, the Badgers would face season-long nemesis, Michigan State, which posted a 3-0 record against Wisconsin during the 1999-00 season. The Badgers' amazing run would end against the Spartans with a 53-41 loss on April 1, 2000. However, Wisconsin impressed many with its sticky defense and finished the season, tying the school single-season record of 22 victories set during the 1998-99 season. (Posted Jan. 10)
  • In 2001, the Big Ten set an NCAA total attendance record for men's basketball with 2,232,253 fans in 170 Conference home games, shattering the old mark of 2,225,913 set during the 1999-2000 season (168 contests). The League also set a new record as Big Ten schools averaged 14,180 fans per game during League contests. That number surpassed the former record of 14,134 per game established in 2000. (Posted Jan. 8)
  • On January 29, 1955, Minnesota defeated Purdue, 59-56, in six overtimes, making the game the longest contest in Big Ten history. The Boilermakers nearly clinched an upset over the 14th-ranked Golden Gophers, who entered the contest leading the Big Ten, however, Dick Garmaker paced Minnesota with 18 points for the win. The Golden Gophers would clinch another overtime win that season, when Illinois took them to two extra periods one game later. (Posted Jan. 7)
  • On March 18, 1953, Bob Leonard hit a free throw with 27 seconds remaining to give Indiana its second NCAA title in a 69-68 victory over the defending national champion Kansas. The game featured a battle of 6-9 centers - Indiana's Don Schlundt and Kansas' B.H. Born. However, Schlundt came out on top, tallying a game-high 30 points that included nine of IU's 10 in the last period, while Born finished with 26. (Posted Jan. 6)
  • In 1951-52, Illinois became only the second squad in the League to earn back-to-back Final Four appearances since Ohio State went in 1945 and 1946. The Fighting Illini would fall in both national semifinal contests by only two points with Kentucky claiming a 76-74 win in 1951 and St. John nipping Illinois, 61-59, the next season. Illinois went on to claim both consolation games to finish third in the nation, while James Bredar and John Kerr were named to the 1952 All-Tournament team after averaging 13.5 and 12.8 points per game. (Posted Jan. 5)
  • In 1972, Minnesota earned its first appearance in the NCAA Tournament, while also claiming its first Big Ten title in 35 years. Led by first-year head coach Bill Musselman, the Golden Gophers finished with an 18-7 overall record and 11-3 mark. Musselman would become the first men's basketball coach in school history to lead Minnesota to a League crown in his first season, while also boasting the best all-time winning percentage (.683) in school history with a 69-32 career mark. (Posted Jan. 4)
  • In 1980, Iowa recovered from a rash of mid-season injuries to become the third Hawkeye squad to reach the Final Four. Iowa finished in fourth place in the Big Ten standings with a 10-8 record, however, the Hawkeyes came out strong in the NCAA Tournament, defeating N.C. State, Syracuse and Georgetown before advancing to a Final Four showdown with Louisville. Iowa's postseason run would eventually end with an 80-72 loss to the eventual national champion Cardinals. All-American Ronnie Lester averaged 14.7 points per game, despite missing 16 games during the regular season with a knee injury. (Posted Jan. 3)
  • In 1931, Northwestern captured its first outright Big Ten Championship title with an 11-1 League mark and 16-1 overall record. Joe Reiff would become the Wildcats' first All-American after leading the Big Ten in scoring in 1931 and 1933, sandwiching his titles around the 1932 champion - Purdue's John Wooden. (Posted Jan. 2)
  • On December 17, 2001, Michigan State defeated UNC-Asheville, 76-56, at the Breslin Center to set a Big Ten record for consecutive victories at home and break the former mark of 50 held by both Indiana (1991-95) and Ohio State (1959-63). MSU's run would finally end at 53 straight home victories on Jan. 12, 2002, when Wisconsin notched a one-point victory over the Spartans, 64-63, in Conference play. (Posted Jan. 1)
  • On March 13, 1994, Glenn Robinson scored 49 points to lead Purdue over Illinois, 87-77, and clinch the Boilermakers' second outright Big Ten Championship. The Gary, Ind., native finished the Conference season, posting a Big Ten single season record of 31.1 points per game, while also finishing first in League rebounds (9.8 rpg). Robinson became the first Conference player in 16 years to earn both the scoring and rebounding titles in the same year and the first since Minnesota's Mychal Thompson accomplished the feat in 1978. (Posted Dec. 31)
  • In 1995, Penn State's John Amaechi was the first Nittany Lion to earn First Team All-Big Ten honors after leading PSU to a 21-11 overall record and a National Invitation Tournament semifinal appearance. Amaechi, who was also named Academic All-American of the Year in 1995, scored 1,310 points and grabbed 745 points in his three seasons at PSU. He currently ranks fourth in career rebounds and 10th in points on Penn State's all-time annals. (Posted Dec. 30)
  • In 1977, the second year the NCAA kept attendance records for men's basketball, the Big Ten led the nation in total attendance for the first time with a figure of 1,346,889 fans. In the last 27 seasons, the Conference has never given up this title, establishing a new NCAA record in total attendance with 2,342,022 fans in 2001, while also hitting the two million-plus mark for 12 consecutive seasons. (Posted Dec. 29)
  • In 1955, Indiana's Don Schlundt became the League's first three-time scoring champion when he posted 26.4 points per game during his senior season. Schlundt was the fifth player in the Big Ten to reach the 20-plus scoring average after tallying 25.5 points per game as a sophomore and followed with a 27.1 scoring average in 1954. He finished his career setting the Big Ten record and becoming one of the first 10 collegiate players to score 2,000 career points. Schlundt currently ranks 10th on the Conferences' all-time scoring leaders list with 2,192 points. (Posted Dec. 28) 
  • In 1989, Michigan and Illinois advanced to the Final Four, marking the second time in Conference history that two Big Ten teams competed in the NCAA semifinals. The Illini had defeated the Wolverines twice during the regular season, including the final Conference game of the year for both squads. However, Michigan prevailed when Sean Higgins' shot at the buzzer clinched an 83-81 victory for the Wolverines. Michigan advanced to the championship game where it claimed the Wolverines' first national title with an 80-79 overtime win over Seton Hall. (Posted Dec. 27)
  • On March 19, 1960, Ohio State won its first-ever national crown defeating California, 75-55, in the 1960 NCAA Championship game. Fred Taylor, in his second season as head coach, led the Buckeyes to one of the biggest title-game routs in NCAA history, posting 20 points more than the Bears. Ohio State All-American Jerry Lucas was voted the Most Outstanding Player of the Final Four after notching a game-high 16 points and 10 rebounds in the championship game. (Posted Dec. 26)
  • In 1969-70, Iowa captured its fifth Big Ten crown in school history, while setting the single-season scoring record of 102.9 points per game during the Conference season. The Hawkeyes, who posted a perfect 14-0 League mark and 20-5 overall record, scored over 100 points 12 times and had four players average over 17 points per game that season. The 1969-70 squad, nicknamed the "Six Pack" still remains the highest scoring team in Big Ten history. (Posted. Dec. 25)
  • On January 6, 1914, Wisconsin posted the only shutout in Big Ten history defeating Parsons, 50-0, at home. The "perfect game" was just part of an unblemished season during head coach Walter Meanwell's third season, as the Badgers went on to finish the year with a 15-0 mark and claim the Helms Foundation National Championship. Meanwell, known as the "Little Doctor," pioneered a quick, finesse-oriented offensive game plan known as "The Wisconsin System" which was the first to feature short passes, weaving player movement and the use of pivots and screens. (Posted. Dec. 24)
  • In 2004, Minnesota's Kris Humphries became the first freshman in Conference history to lead the League in both scoring and rebounding. He finished the regular season averaging 21 points and 9.5 caroms per game. Earning Big Ten Freshman of the Year honors, the 6-9 forward became just the sixth player to top the Conference in both categories and the first since Purdue's Glenn Robinson accomplished this feat as a sophomore in 1994.(Posted Dec. 23)
  • On March 4, 1993, Indiana's Calbert Cheaney connected on a baseline jumper in a 98-69 victory over Northwestern to become the Big Ten's all-time career scoring leader. Cheaney finished his career at Indiana with 2,613 points, a record that still stands, while also earning his third All-America laurel and the 1993 National Player of the Year accolade. (Posted Dec. 22)
  • On March 7, 2000, Purdue's Gene Keady earned his sixth Big Ten Coach of the Year honor, a League record, after leading the Boilermakers to a 24-10 overall mark and a second-place finish in the Conference during the 1999-2000 season. Purdue advanced to the Elite Eight for the second time under Keady and finished just four points short of advancing to the Final Four after a 64-60 loss to Wisconsin. (Posted Dec. 21)
  • In 1946, Northwestern's Max Morris became the first-ever recipient of the Big Ten's Chicago Tribune Big Ten Player of the Year honor. He led the Conference in scoring with 16.5 points per game, while also earning All-America honors as a member of the Wildcats' football team. Morris joins Otto Graham as one of only two multi-sport All-Americans at Northwestern. (Posted Dec. 20)
  • On March 4, 2000, in a 114-63 victory over the Wolverines, Michigan State's Mateen Cleaves dished out a Big Ten record 20 assists to become the first player in League history to reach the 20-assist plateau. He would finish the year posting a single-season record of 274 assists, breaking the former record held by Earvin "Magic" Johnson since 1978-79. Cleaves also finished his career at MSU as the all-time Big Ten assists leader with 816. (Posted. Dec. 19)
  • On March 18, 2001, Penn State defeated No. 5 and second-seeded North Carolina, 82-74, in front of an excited Superdome crowd during the second round of the NCAA Tournament. The win advanced the Nittany Lions to their first-ever Sweet 16 appearance since the tournament expanded to 64 teams. The senior trio of Joe Crispin, Titus Ivory and Gyasi Cline-Heard all reached double-figures, posting 21 points each. (Posted Dec. 18)
  • In 1964, Michigan reached its first-ever Final Four in only its second NCAA Tournament appearance in school history. The scoring duo of Cazzie Russell and Bill Buntin led the Wolverines that season both averaging over 23 points per game. In the Final Four, Michigan fell to Duke, 91-80, but the Wolverines came back with a vengeance in the consolation game, defeating Kansas State, 100-90, for the third-place title. It also marked the first time in Michigan history that a team cracked the 100-point barrier in postseason play. (Posted Dec. 17)
  • In 1915, Illinois became one of only 11 squads in League history to post an undefeated record with a 16-0 mark. Under third-year head coach Ralph Jones, who later went on to coach the Chicago Bears from 1930-33, the Illini captured their first Big Ten title in school history with a 12-0 record, while also being named national champions by the Helms Foundation. (Posted Dec. 16)
  • In 1962, Ohio State's Jerry Lucas became the first three-time Big Ten Chicago Tribune Most Valuable Player of the Year honoree after leading the Buckeyes to three consecutive Big Ten titles, the 1960 national championship, and three Final Four appearances in the early 1960s. Lucas led the nation in field goal percentage for three consecutive years and still holds the Ohio State career record and ranks third all-time in Conference history with a .624 figure. (Posted Dec. 15)
  • On March 29, 1976, for the first time in NCAA history, two teams from the same conference met in the national title game when Indiana and Michigan competed for the 1976 crown. Scott May and Kent Benson triggered the IU offense, scoring 26 and 25 points, respectively, while leading the Hoosiers to an 86-68 victory over the Wolverines. Finishing with a perfect 32-0 record, Indiana became one of only two schools ever to go undefeated. (Posted Dec. 14)
  • On January 14, 1990, Indiana head coach Bobby Knight captured his 229th victory in Conference play with a 65-52 victory over Purdue to set a Big Ten record. Knight still remains the all-time leader in League victories with 353, while also ranking first among all Big Ten coaches with a winning percentage of .734 (661-240). (Posted Dec. 13)
  • On March 6, 2000, Jarrett Stephens became the first player in Penn State history to be voted to both the coaches and media First Team All-Big Ten squads. During the 1999-00 season, Stephens led the Nittany Lions to the Big Ten Tournament semifinals and National Invitation Tournament finals. The 6-7 forward averaged 18.8 points and 10.5 rebounds per game in 2000, while also finishing his career as one of PSU's top 20 all-time scorers. (Posted Dec. 12)
  • 1955-56: Iowa became only the third Conference school to post back-to-back NCAA Final Four appearances. After falling in the semifinals the year before, the "Fabulous Five" of Carl Cain, Bill Logan, Sham Scheuerman, Bill Schoof and Bill Seaburg advanced to the national title game in 1956, but fell to the defending NCAA Champion San Francisco, 83-71. Cain earned First Team All-America honors, while Logan led the team in scoring and rebounding to be named to his second consecutive All-Big Ten First Team. (Posted Dec. 11)
  • On March 29, 1941, Wisconsin claimed the second NCAA title in Big Ten history with a 39-34 victory over Washington State. The Badgers, who had finished in the lower division of the Big Ten just one year earlier, were led by All-Americans Gene Englund and John Kotz. Englund set the Big Ten scoring record with 162 points that season, while Kotz became the third Conference player to earn MVP honors at the NCAA Tournament. (Posted Dec. 10)
  • On December 13, 2003, Michigan State hosted Kentucky in Detroit's Ford Field and welcomed 78,129 fans to the event to establish the world record for single-game basketball attendance. The Spartans' record turnout surpassed the previous world mark of 75,000 fans set on August 21, 1951, during a Harlem Globetrotters exhibition game played in Berlin Olympic Stadium in Germany. (Posted Dec. 9)
  • On February 28, 1970, Purdue's Rick Mount posted a Big Ten single-game record of 61 points in a 108-107 loss to Iowa. Known as "The Rocket," Mount scored those points without the benefit of the three-point shot and many speculate that if the arc had existed he would have finished with 13 three-pointers and 74 points. Mount concluded his senior year claiming his second consensus All-America honor, while ranking first on Purdue's all-time scoring list with 2,323 points. His feat of 61 points still remains the Conference record. (Posted Dec. 8)
  • On March 30, 1940, Indiana claimed the Conference's first-ever NCAA title with a 60-42 win over Kansas in the 1940 NCAA Championship. Known as the "Hurryin' Hoosiers," Indiana used a display of speed to crack an early 14-14 tie and roar to a 13-point lead at halftime against the Jayhawks. IU's 34 percent shooting performance in that game was a figure considered astounding at that time. Marvin Huffman, who earned MVP honors, joined Bill Menke and Jay McCleary as members of the All-Tournament team. (Posted Dec. 7)
  • On March 27, 1939, Northwestern's Patten Gym was the site of the first NCAA Men's Basketball Championship game. In front of a crowd of 5,500 (which included numerous fraternity and sorority club members, many of which were let in free to beef up attendance), Oregon defeated Ohio State, 46-33, to claim the national title. The Buckeyes' Jimmy Hull, who averaged 20 points during the tournament, became the first player to earn the NCAA's Most Outstanding Player award.(Posted Dec. 6)
  • 1930-1932: Purdue's John Wooden became the Big Ten's first three-time All-American from 1930-32. Wooden, who is also known for his success as a coach at UCLA, led the Boilermakers to two Conference titles and a national championship (prior to NCAA-sanctioned postseason play). He was also the Big Ten's top scorer during his senior year with an unheard-of 12.1 points per game. Wooden's League record of three consecutive honors would stand 30 years until Ohio State's Jerry Lucas was named an All-American from 1960-62. (Posted Dec. 5)
  • On March 17, 1906, Minnesota defeated Wisconsin, 16-10, to claim the first Conference-sponsored basketball title with a 6-1 League mark. Led by Garfield Brown, who was the second first team All-American in Gopher history, Minnesota finished the 1905-06 season with a 13-2 overall record, one game above the second-place Badgers. Head coach L.J. Cooke, who also earned his first of three Big Ten titles that season, still remains the winningest coach in school history, posting a 250-135-2 mark in 28 seasons. (Posted Dec. 4)

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